CHAPTER NO:- 10 》PART:- 5 》Birthmarks and Birth Defects Corresponding to Wounds on Deceased Persons in their past lives

Almost nothing is known about why pigmented birthmarks (moles or nevi) occur in particular locations of the skin. The causes of most birth defects are also unknown.
▪ About 35% of children who claim to remember previous lives have birthmarks and/or birth defects that they (or adult informants) attribute to wounds on a person whose life the child remembers.
▪ The cases of 210 such children have been investigated. The birthmarks were usually areas of hairless, puckered skin; some were areas of little or no pigmentation (hypopigmented  macules);  others  were  areas  of  increased pigmentation (hyperpigmented nevi).
▪ The birth defects were nearly always of rare types. In cases in which a deceased person was identified the details of whose life unmistakably matched the child’s statements, a close correspondence was nearly always found between the birthmarks and/or birth defects on the child and the wounds on the deceased person.
▪ In 43 of 49 cases in which a medical document (usually a postmortem report) was obtained, it confirmed the correspondence between wounds and birthmarks (or birth defects).
▪ There is little evidence that parents and other informants imposed a false identity on the child in order to explain the child's birthmark or birth defect. Some paranormal process seems required to account for at least some of the details of these cases, including the birthmarks and birth defects.
▪ In his recent publication, Dr. Stevenson has opened his bulky file of cases where reincarnated persons have birthmarks and birth defects corresponding to the wounds of the deceased person.9 About 35% of children who claim to remember previous lives have birthmarks and birth defects that they attribute to wounds on a person whose life the child remembers.
▪ Dr. Stevenson’s research team has investigated the cases of 210 such children. Photographs of birthmarks and illustrations of the weapons form part of the evidence in this explorative research.
▪ The birth marks were usually areas of hairless, puckered skin, some were areas  of  increased  pigmentation  and  some  were  areas  of  little  or  no pigmentation. The birth defects were nearly always of rare types.
▪ In cases in which a deceased person was identified, the details of whose life unmistakably matched the child’s statements, a close correspondence was nearly always found between the birthmarks and birth defects on the child and wounds on the deceased person.
▪ In 43 of 49 cases in which a  medical  document  was  obtained, it confirmed the correspondence between wounds and birthmarks or birth defects. Dr. Stevenson argues in favor of a paranormal  origin  for  these  birth manifestations, excluding reasons for maternal impressions as causative factors. Currently, the objective evidence in favor of the hypothesis of reincarnation is the presence of birthmarks and birth defects corresponding to the wounds of the deceased persons.
▪ Pasricha in her report of ten such cases, after discussing the alternative explanations  of  chance,  maternal  impressions,  super-psi  and  possession, proposes that the hypothesis of reincarnation may best explain these cases.
▪ The simplest normal explanation for this phenomenon might appear to be chance. But the multiplicity of the birthmarks corresponding to the wounds of the deceased person whose life the subject remembers, and the unusual nature of the birthmarks cannot be explained away as a mere coincidence.
▪ The skin of a normal sized adult would comprise 160 squares each ten centimeters sq. Locating the skin marks within such a grid, the odds against chance of a single birthmark corresponding in location with a single wound is 1/160. But the chance explanation becomes much weaker in which more than one wound and birthmark correspond.
▪ For example Stevenson has eighteen cases in which a child claims to remember being shot by a bullet, and has two birth marks which are found to correspond to bullet wounds of entry (small) and exit wound (larger). Here again a pattern of birthmarks matches the pattern of wounding of the deceased.
▪ These cases constitute the strongest evidence. When two birthmarks thus correspond with two wounds, the odds against chance increase to 1/60 into 1/160 or 1/25000.
▪ An extreme case is Necip of Turkey who had seven birthMarks, six of which correspond to wounds described in a medical document.8 In this case the odds against chance coincidence are truly astronomical.

Matching Scars and Birthmarks

▪ One of the most astounding pieces of physical evidence for reincarnation lies in scars and birthmarks on children that correspond to wounds on a deceased person’s body. They are oftentimes in the same shape as the wound occurring in a child’s past life memory of an injury.
▪ The wounds are also verified by medical records, such as photographs and documents created for autopsy reports.
▪ According to Dr. Ian Stevenson, the leading authority on reincarnation research at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, some of the children have scar tissue too abnormally shaped and closely matching to be labelled purely coincidental. Examples of such marks include:
1. Scattered markings on a child’s chest that match with a shotgun blast to the     victim’s chest
2. Scars on the exact area on the back of the head where the victim was knifed
3. A boy born almost absent of fingers on one hand matching the described person’s amputated fingers
▪ More examples of these findings along with photographs can be found in Dr. Stevenson’s book “Where Reincarnation and Biology Intersect”


Stevenson found that in cases of violent death the child may show a birthmark where he was knifed, shot or whatever caused his death.

1. An example of one of Dr Stevenson’s birthmark cases is that of Ravi Shankar. He recalled being horrifically decapitated as a child by a relative who was hoping that he would inherit the child’s father's wealth. The reborn child was found to have a birthmark encircling his neck. When his claim was investigated it was found that the person he claimed to have been, did in fact die by decapitation.
2. A second case involves a child in Turkey who recalled being a robber who was about to be captured by the police had committed suicide, shooting himself with a rifle by placing the muzzle against his right underside of the chin. The child who claimed to remember his life was born with a very distinct mark under his chin. On further investigation, he was found to have another birthmark on top of his head exactly where the bullet would have exited. When Dr Stevenson was investigating this particular case in Turkey, an old man informed Stevenson that he remembered the incident and testified as to the condition of the shot body.
3. A Thai woman had three separate linear hypopigmented scar like birthmarks near the midline of her back; as a child she had remembered the life of a woman who was killed when struck three times in the back with an axe.(Informants  verified  this  mode  of  death,  but  no  medical  record  was obtainable.)
4. A woman of Burma was born with two perfectly round birthmarks in her left chest; they slightly overlapped, and one was about half the size of the other. As a child she said she remembered the life of a woman who was accidentally shot and killed with a shotgun. A responsible informant said the shotgun cartridge had contained shot of two different sizes.
5. Another Burmese child said that she remembered the life of her deceased   aunt,   who   had   died   during   surgery   for   congenital   heart disease. This child had a long, vertical linear hypo pigmented birthmark close to the midline of her lower chest and upper abdomen; this birthmark corresponded  to  the  surgical  incision  for  the  repair  of  the  aunt’s  heart.
6. In contrast, a child of Turkey had a horizontal linear birthmark across  the  right  upper  quadrant  of  his  abdomen.  It  resembled  the  scar of a surgeon’s transverse abdominal incision. The child said that he remembered the life of his paternal grandfather, who had become jaundiced and was operated on before he died.
7. Two Burmese subjects remembered as children the lives of persons who had died after being bitten by venomous snakes, and the birthmarks of each corresponded to therapeutic incisions made at the sites of the snakebites on the persons whose lives they remembered.
8. Another Burmese subject also said as a child that she remembered the life of a child who had been bitten on the foot by a snake and died. In this case, however, the child’s uncle had applied a burning cheroot to the site of the bite - a folk remedy for snakebite in parts of Burma; and the subject’s birthmark was round and located at the site on the foot where the bitten child’s uncle had applied the cheroot.
▪ Among 895 cases of children who claimed to remember a previous life (or were thought by adults to have had a previous life), birthmarks and/or birth defects attributed to the previous life were reported in 309 (35%) of the subjects.
▪ The birthmark or birth defect of the child was said to correspond to a wound (usually fatal) or other mark on the deceased person whose life the child said it remembered.

Why Reincarnation and Biology Intersect

▪ This is dramatic evidence of how past life traumas become so embedded in an individual’s cellular memory that they are carried from one life to the next. In 43 of 49 cases in which a medical document (usually a post-mortem report) was obtained, it confirmed the correspondence between wounds: and birthmarks or birth defects.
▪ The work suggests surprising answers to such  questions as the following : Writing as a scientist and a Western medical professional, Stevenson realizes  that  the  idea  that  wounds  on  a  deceased  person  can  influence the  embryo  of  a  later-born  baby  is  subversive  to  many  assumptions  of modern biology.
▪ Photographs  of  birthmarks  and  illustrations  of  weapons  form  part of the evidence in this daring and explorative research. This work will be of particular interest to physicians, psychiatrists, biologists, and anthropologists
▪ In  addition,  those  concerned  with  paranormal  phenomena  and  the mind-brain problem will find this work challenging. Ian Stevenson examined reports of people in different parts of the world who claimed to remember past lives, mostly young children.
▪ Why does someone born with a birth defect have the one he or she has, instead of another one ? Why do some children show phobias in early infancy when they have had no traumatic experiences and no model for the phobia in their family ? Why  are  some  monozygotic (one-egg)  twins  markedly  different from each other ?
▪ Why do many boys who later become homosexual show effeminate behavior  in infancy before their parents can have influenced them to do so ?
▪ He explored the idea that “ birthmarks and other skin lesions and abnormalities may provide evidence of cutaneous injuries sustained in a previous life, thus supporting the notion of reincarnation ”.
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